S-Anon International Family Groups

The Structure of the S-Anon/S-Ateen Fellowship

In order to accomplish our goal as a fellowship, i.e., carrying the message to as many people as we can who need the help of S-Anon, we need a structure within which we can function to achieve that goal.  An overview of the S-Anon/S-Ateen Service Structure, both traditional and legal, can be found below.  For more detailed information regarding the structure, please refer to Part 2 of the S-Anon/S-Ateen Service Manual.

View a diagram of the S-Anon/S-Ateen Service Structure.  Note: This diagram supersedes the service structure graphic in the S-Anon/S-Ateen Service Manual.

 

Traditional S-Anon/S-Ateen Service Structure

The traditional S-Anon/S-Ateen service structure exists to assure each local group that its concerns and opinions are taken into consideration and are represented in the group conscience of S-Anon as a whole.  The information below describes the structure that we hope will facilitate that participation.

Local Groups

The group is the basic unit where close personal interchange among members takes place.  Groups usually elect trusted servants to take responsibility for the operations of the group for a set period of service.  If there is a local Information Services Group/Intergroup, generally one or two members serve as representatives to that body.  Groups in each area are eligible to be represented at the World Service Conference (WSC) by an Area Delegate (see below).

Local Information Services Group/Intergroup

S-Anon/S-Ateen Information Services Groups (ISGs), sometimes called Intergroups, are made up of representatives from the local groups to coordinate services for the groups they serve.  ISGs exist to facilitate communication between local groups and to work together in planning local or regional events, or community outreach.  Where possible, an ISG may also coordinate election of the World Service Conference Area Delegate.  Intergroups usually meet regularly and can also serve as a forum to discuss group problems in light of S-Anon's Twelve Traditions and Twelve Concepts of Service.

Areas/Area Delegates to the World Service Conference

The purpose of the World Service Conference (WSC) is to provide a forum where the issues and policies affecting all S-Anon and S-Ateen groups can be discussed and informed decisions can be made with all members of the fellowship being represented.   Read more about the World Service Conference, including its past decisions and upcoming motions.

For purposes of representation at the WSC, the United States and Canada is organized by “Areas,” with each Area entitled to send one Delegate to the annual WSC. There are presently 54 Areas. Each Area covers one of the 50 states (except California, which has two Areas—North and South), and there are three Areas in Canada—East, West, and Central.  Read more about the role and responsibilities of an Area Delegate.

 

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Legal S-Anon/S-Ateen Service Structure

The Board of Trustees is the legal entity responsible for making administrative, legal, and financial decisions for the fellowship of S-Anon.  The S-Anon Twelve Traditions and the S-Anon Twelve Concepts of Service guide the BOT in carrying out their functions.

S-Anon/S-Ateen Board of Trustees

The Board of Trustees (BOT) is the service arm of the World Service Conference (WSC).  It exists as the legal entity, S-Anon International Family Groups, Inc.  The BOT is comprised of the Officers of the Board, the six Regional Trustees, Trustees at Large (members who chair Standing Committees), and the WSO Executive Director.  Read more about the functions of the BOT.

Regional Trustees

For purposes of selecting Regional Trustees to the S-Anon Board of Trustees, North America is divided into six regions, which are outlined in the S-Anon/S-Ateen Service Manual.  Regional Trustees help to ensure that our Board of Trustees is as responsive as possible to the needs and desires of the groups it serves.  Read more about the selection, qualifications, and responsibilities of the Regional Trustees.

To become one of the six Regional Trustees that serve on S-Anon's Board of Trustees, the candidate must be voted in either by the groups in the Region in which he/she would serve or by a vote of the Board of Trustees.  Read more about the process for electing a Regional Trustee.

Standing Committees of the Board of Trustees

The S-Anon Board of Trustees is authorized by the Bylaws of the S-Anon Family Groups to create certain Standing Committees and other committees deemed necessary to carry on special work.  The work done by BOT committees is done independently, but final review and approval of the committee work rests with the BOT.  Read more about the purpose and duties of the Standing Committees.


This page was last modified on 3/13/16.